Tag Archives: contemporary art

Insomnia

DSCF6046

Fabric, plastic sheet, polyester wadding, rope, PVC pipe, food colouring solution, wood, alarm clock

As much as it feels like a state of the mind, sleeplessness is a physical condition, a malfunction of the brain. Insomnia gives you a lot of time to think – of your insomnia among (endless) other things. The paradox is, that the grave anxieties which cause insomnia more often than not manifest themselves in trivial thoughts that roam in your head while you are tossing and turning in the dark.

Using trivial materials found in the drawers, cabinets, and the garden of my home and studio – the spaces I inhabit physically during the day, I have created an object which is a material embodiment of my insomniac mind. Assembling this entanglement felt like I was holding my thoughts in my hands. Weird, but fun.

Insomnia was included in Nocturnes, a group art show which I curated in The Grand Gallery in Freeport, Grand Bahama. Here are a couple of other images showing “the thing”:

DSCF6050

DSCF6041

Photography: Christine Matthai

You are Being Abducted!

 

Imagine that you live in paradise – blue skies, azure waters, silky air and mojitos.  God’s own residence is just across the canal from you, so to speak. You can see him often sitting alone on his porch, staring at the distance.

If you are trying to be an artist in a place like this, you can choose to paint the world around you, of course – sunsets, coconuts, beautiful people. Or you can choose to look at it from a Heavenly vantage point – through the eyes of its creator.

The paintings in the Abduction series have been conceived as a  journey to a different dimension from where the world is seen like an entanglement of anthropomorphic or manmade shapes floating aimlessly in the void, where the time to move the eye from one frame to the next can be the difference between being and not being.

It is concerned with the idea that while humanity is absorbed in political, material and interpersonal squabbles, the planet is coming perilously close to the limit of its resources. That we, with all our possessions, ambitions, passions and complications, are nothing more than a grain of dust, a blink in god’s eye. It is an appeal to shift from our small minded point of view and re-define our values from a cosmic perspective.

My work is influenced by a tradition of expressive figurative painting starting from Michelangelo, to Caravaggio, Gericault and Lucien Freud.  I am seeking to create images which are imposing, imperative, even aggressive – this is not an invitation to quiet contemplation, but abduction to a place where the only option is to face reality, the point in space and time, where we cannot look the other way, as there is no other way to look.

The piece that you see here is titled Kingdom Come and reflects two moments in time, which for the human race may be separated by centuries, but are just a blink in God’s eye.

If you see something else, please let me know – there is no right or wrong here.

Excited like a school girl!

My first participation in Miami with my new gallery Curator’s Voice Art  Projects opens next Saturday – March 8th. On April 5th I will have my very own Artist Talk there too.

CVAP is a gallery in the heart of Wynwood, Miami’s main art district, managed by Dr. Milagros Bello, a distinguished curator, educator and art critic. Having the endorsement of someone of her stature is more than I had ever hoped for.  I will be showing work from my new Abduction series, which is ongoing and never exhibited before. You can have a glimpse here with more to come in my future blog posts, when I will talk about the concept behind Abduction and each piece individually.

My Mama has told me not to brag, but this time I will make and exception 😉

Parallels_postcard2

Quick Quiz

Question: what is this?

Gagosian @ Frieze

Answer: Koons R Us – the store where Damien Hirst buys toys for his baby:

 

 

 

 

 

Damien-Hirst-via-New-York-Times

The bill goes to Sheikha Mayasa of Qatar.

You see reader? All is taken care of.

The future is f***ing great.

Image sources:

Q: Gagosian Gallery; A: NY Times